Equipping For Adventure

They say that money makes the world go around, and that applies to the Dark Dungeons world just as much as it applies to the real world. Trade and commerce are the backbone of civilisation, and even brave adventurers need to buy things—from food to armour to ships or even siege artillery.

Money

The actual type of money that people use, in terms of the names and denominations of coins, will vary from campaign setting to campaign setting and probably from country to country within an individual campaign setting.

However, for simplicity’s sake and consistency’s sake, the Dark Dungeons rules assume a simple gold standard. The standard coin that most prices are measured in is the Gold Piece (usually abbreviated to simply gp). The value of a gold piece is—quite literally—its weight in gold, rather than any artificial economic value. Complex economic factors such as exchange rates are assumed not to exist.

A gold piece is a large (by real-world standards) gold coin approximately 3cm in diameter and 1/3cm in thickness. This amount of gold weighs 1.6 ounces, or 1/10 of a pound. Therefore a pound of gold is worth 10gp, and 10gp weighs a pound in weight.

Other coins are made from a similar weight of different metals—namely copper, silver, electrum (a natural alloy of gold and silver) and platinum. The relative rarity of these metals gives the different coins their different values relative to gold.

1 cp (copper piece) = 1/100 gp

1 sp (silver piece) = 1/10 gp

1 ep (electrum piece) = 1/2 gp

1 pp (platinum piece) = 5 gp

Starting Money

Newly created first level characters start with a set of peasant clothes, and with 3d6x10gp to spend on other items.

A newly created magic-user or elf character will also start with a spell book containing Read Magic and one other first level spell.

If a character is introduced in the middle of a campaign (to replace a dead character) then the Game Master should give the character money and equipment—including magic items—in line with the amount that the rest of the party have.

Encumbrance and Weight

Just as the gold coin is the standard for prices, the weight of a gold coin—1/10 of a pound—is used as the standard for weights. The weights of most items are measured in Coins (usually abbreviated to cn). A character can normally carry only 400cn without being slowed by the weight. The distance per round that a character can move carrying different weights is shown below:

Up to 400cn = 40’/round

401cn to 800cn = 30’/round

801cn to 1,200cn = 20’/round

1,201cn to 1,600cn = 10’/round

1,601cn to 2,400cn = 5’/round

2,401cn and over = Cannot move

Armour is counted when calculating the encumbrance of a character, but normal clothing is not counted if it is being worn, only if it is being carried.

Mystics can move faster than the standard 40’/round. When they are encumbered, reduce their movement proportionally by the same amount as that of other characters.

Example: Brother Karne is an 8th level mystic, and can therefore move at 65’/round. He is trying to escape from some ogres, carrying the unconscious body of Elfstar with him.

In her armour, Elfstar weighs about 170lb, which is 1,700cn. This would slow down a normal person to an eighth of their normal speed (from 40’/round to 5’/round), so it slows Brother Karne down by the same proportion. Brother Karne can carry her at a speed of 8’/round (an eighth of 65’/round).

Table 8-1: Mundane Items

Item Weight Cost 20 Arrows 10cn 5gp 2 Arrows (silver) 1cn 10gp Backpack (holds 400cn) 20cn 5gp Belt 5cn 2sp 30 Bolts 10cn 10gp 3 Bolts (silver) 1cn 15gp Boots (plain) 10cn 2gp Boots (fancy) 15cn 5gp 20 Bullets 4cn 2gp 5 Bullets (silver) 1cn 25gp Cloak (short) 10cn 5sp Cloak (long) 15cn 1gp Clothes (peasant) 20cn 5sp Clothes (merchant) 20cn 5gp Clothes (noble) 20cn 20gp Clothes (royal) 30cn 50+gp 5 Darts 1cn 1gp Grappling Hook 80cn 25gp Hammer (small) 10cn 2gp Hat 3cn 2sp Holy Symbol 1cn 25gp Holy Water (small vial) 1cn 25gp Iron Spike 5cn 1sp Lantern 30cn 1gp Mirror (steel) 5cn 5gp Oil (flask) 10cn 2gp 30 Pellets 6cn 1gp 5 Pellets (silver) 1cn 25gp Pole (10’) 100cn 1gp Purse (holds 50cn) 2cn 5sp Quiver 5cn 1gp Rations (1 week’s, dried) 70cn 15gp Rations (1 week’s, fresh) 200cn 5gp Red Powder (flask) 10cn 5gp Rope (50’) 50cn 1gp Sack (holds 200cn) 1cn 1gp Sack (holds 600cn) 5cn 2gp Spell Book 25cn 25gp Tent 200cn 20gp Thieves’ Tools 10cn 25gp Tinder Box 5cn 3gp Torch 20cn 2sp Waterskin (empty) 5cn 1gp Waterskin (full, 1 day’s) 30cn 1gp

Mundane Items

Arrows: Arrows are the ammunition used by bows. The same arrows are usable in either long or short bows. Arrows are often broken in use. At the end of a combat, a character will only be able to recover half (round down) of the arrows fired during that combat. The rest are either lost or unusable.

Backpack (holds 400cn): A leather or canvas backpack with shoulder straps for carrying things while leaving the hands free.

Belt: A sturdy leather belt.

Bolts: Bolts are the ammunition used by crossbows. The same bolts are usable in either heavy or light crossbows. Bolts are often broken in use. At the end of a combat, a character will only be able to recover half (round down) of the bolts fired during that combat. The rest are either lost or unusable.

Boots (plain): Simple yet sturdy hard leather boots for walking or riding in.

Boots (fancy): Ornate boots, possibly with fold-down tops or designs and patterns on the leather.

Bullets: Bullets are the ammunition used by guns. The same bullets are usable in either pistols or smoothbores. Bullets are not recoverable after they have been fired. Those that have not been lost will have been deformed beyond use.

Cloak (short): A waist length weatherproof outer garment.

Cloak (long): A knee or ankle length weatherproof outer garment.

Clothes (peasant): Simple clothes that a peasant or manual labourer (or even slave) would wear.

Clothes (merchant): High quality clothes that a middle-class artisan or merchant would wear.

Clothes (noble): Fancy clothing that a minor noble or other rich person would wear.

Clothes (royal): Extravagant and ostentatious clothing fit for a king or even an emperor.

Darts: Darts are the ammunition used by blowguns. The same darts are usable in either small or large blowguns. Darts are usually dipped in poison of some kind before use, although such poison is not included in the basic price.

Darts are often broken in use. At the end of a combat, a character will only be able to recover half (round down) of the darts fired during that combat. The rest are either lost or unusable.

Grappling Hook: A large iron hook that is tied to the end of a rope and then swung over a target such as a wall or tree branch. The hooks catch on the target and support the weight of someone climbing the rope.

Hammer (small): A working hammer, for hammering nails, spikes or tent pegs.

Hat: A weatherproof hat made out of waxed linen.

Holy Symbol: This is a small symbol, usually metal, that represents an icon of the character’s religion. Most clerics carry holy symbols, although they can operate without one.

Holy Water (small vial): Water that has been especially prepared by a cleric or other priest. It is used in some religious ceremonies and can damage some undead monsters.

Iron Spike: A 9” long iron nail. These find a multitude of uses, from wedging doors open (or shut) or to use as tent pegs. They are most useful if accompanied by a hammer for driving them into hard surfaces.

Lantern: An oil fired lamp that gives of light within a 30’ radius. A single flask of oil will last 4 hours.

Mirror (steel): Useful for personal grooming, and also for seeing around corners or fighting creatures without looking at them directly. Fighting in such a manner gives a –2 penalty to attack rolls.

Oil (flask): Fine grade lantern oil. If a burning wick is inserted, it can also make an emergency missile weapon, doing 1d8 damage to all within a 5’ radius, with a chance to also set them alight (see Chapter 9: Dungeon Delving for the dangers of being set alight).

Pellets: Pellets are the ammunition used by slings. Pellets are easy to lose in use. At the end of a combat, a character will only be able to recover half (round down) of the pellets fired during that combat. The rest are lost.

Pole (10’): A stout wooden pole often used to probe ahead or to prod suspicious looking piles of refuse.

Purse (holds 50cn): A small leather or cloth purse or pouch that ties to a belt.

Quiver: A leather container that holds 20 arrows or crossbow bolts.

Rations (1 week’s, dried): Enough dried, smoked, or otherwise preserved food to feed a person for a week. The preservation means that this food will last for two months before going bad.

Rations (1 week’s, fresh): Enough fresh food to feed a person for a week. The food will go bad after a week.

Red Powder (flask): Red powder is a naturally occurring magical substance with unusual properties. In large quantities such as in a barrel it is perfectly safe, but in small quantities it becomes dangerously flammable or even explosive.

Although it is normally found in large underground deposits with the consistency of talc or other soft rock, it is normally ground up (in a water bath to stop it igniting) and then sold in powdered form. Water temporarily suppresses the explosive properties of red powder, but does not spoil it—it is usable again once it has dried sufficiently.

Red powder is normally used to power guns; a single flask is enough to power 100 gun shots or a single cannon shot. However, in an emergency a full flask can also have a wick or fuse stuck in it and lit, and then be hurled as a grenade like weapon. In this case it will explode for 2d6 damage to all within 10’.

Targets that can make a saving throw vs Breath Weapon take only half damage. Because of red powder’s unusual selfstabilising property, multiple flasks cannot be combined in order to make bigger explosions.

Rope (50’): A strong hemp or silk rope that can support up to 7,500cn (approximately three people and their equipment).

Sack (holds 200cn): A canvas sack for either carrying in one hand or loading onto a horse or other beast of burden. Small enough to be tied around a belt.

Sack (holds 600cn): A canvas sack for either carrying in two hands or loading onto a horse or other beast of burden.

Spell Book: A large book for a magic- user or elf to write their spells into. A spell book contains 100 pages, and can hold up to 100 levels worth of spells.

Tent: A waxed canvas tent with wooden poles. Although heavy, such tents are invaluable when travelling through inclement weather and cold nights.

Thieves’ Tools: A variety of lockpicks, needles, wire, pliers, etc. A thief cannot pick locks or disarm traps without a set of these tools.

Tinder Box: A set of fire making equipment in a water resistant box. Starting a fire with a tinder box takes 1d3 rounds.

Torch: A 1’ to 2’ length of wood dipped in pitch or tallow. A torch gives off light in a 30’ radius and burns for one hour. If used in combat, a torch has the same statistics (and uses the same weapons feats) as a club.

Waterskin: A waterskin is a flexible bladder that can hold up to two pints of water or other liquid, enough for a person for one day.

Weapons

In all cases, refer to Chapter 6: Weapon Feats for full details of the weapon.

Axe, Battle: A battle axe is a two handed axe 2’-4’ in length, usually with a double blade or a spike on the reverse of the blade.

Axe, Hand: A hand axe is a one handed axe 1’-2’ in length, usually with a single blade. A hand axe is often thrown while its owner rushes towards melee range.

Blackjack: A blackjack, also known as a cosh, is a small leather club usually filled with sand. Blackjacks are too soft to do significant damage, but are very useful for temporarily knocking people unconscious without doing permanent damage.

Blowgun, Small: Small blowguns are tubes 1’-2’ in length through which tiny darts are blown. Blowgun darts are too small to cause more than a scratch, but are an effective means by which poison can be delivered. Small blowguns can be used in one hand. Blowguns require the use of darts as ammunition.

Blowgun, Large: Large blowguns are tubes 2’-4’ in length through which tiny

Table 8-2: Weapons

Item

Axe, Battle 60cn 7gp Axe, Hand 30cn 4gp Blackjack 5cn 5gp Blowgun, Large 15cn 3gp Blowgun, Small 6cn 6gp Bola 5cn 5gp Bow, Long 30cn 40gp Bow, Short 20cn 25gp Cestus 10cn 5gp Club 50cn 3gp Crossbow, Heavy 80cn 50gp Crossbow, Light 50cn 30gp Dagger 10cn 3gp Halberd 150cn 7gp Hammer, Throwing 25cn 4gp Hammer, War 50cn 5gp Javelin 20cn 1gp Lance 180cn 10gp Mace 30cn 5gp Net 40cn 4gp Pike 80cn 3gp Pistol 20cn 250gp Poleaxe 120cn 5gp Shield, Horned 20cn 15gp Shield, Knife 70cn 65gp Shield, Sword 185cn 200gp Shield, Tusked 275cn 200gp Sling 20cn 2gp Smoothbore 75cn 150gp Spear 30cn 3gp Staff 40cn 5gp Sword, Bastard 80cn 15gp Sword, Normal 60cn 10gp Sword, Short 30cn 7gp Sword, Two-Handed 100cn 15gp Trident 25cn 5gp Whip 100cn 10gp

Weight

Cost

darts are blown. Blowgun darts are too small to cause more than a scratch, but are an effective means by which poison can be delivered. Large blowguns require two hands to fire them. Blowguns require the use of darts as ammunition.

Bolas: A bolas is a set of weights (usually three) on the ends of connected ropes 3’-4’ in length. The bolas is whirled around and then thrown at the opponent in order to entangle or even strangle them.

Bow, Long: A long bow is a 4’-6’ bow, either made from a single piece of wood or a composite of different woods. A long bow requires both hands to fire. Bows require the use of arrows as ammunition.

Bow, Short: A short bow is a 3’-4’ bow, either made from a single piece of wood or a composite of different woods. A short bow requires both hands to fire. Bows require the use of arrows as ammunition.

Cestus: A cestus is a spiked or bladed metal band that may either be worn around the hand or built into a gauntlet. Although only a small weapon, it can be used without incurring off-hand penalties.

Club: A club is a crude blunt weapon—little more than a roughly shaped piece of wood—that can be used in one hand.

Crossbow, Heavy: A heavy crossbow is a large two-handed missile weapon. It has powerful metal arms and a string that is pulled back using a crank.

Crossbows require the use of bolts as ammunition.

Crossbow, Light: A light crossbow is a medium sized missile weapon, although it still needs two hands to wield. It has powerful metal arms and a string that is pulled back using a lever.

Crossbows require the use of bolts as ammunition.

Dagger: A dagger is a short light blade which is 18” long or less. Daggers are popular weapons because their small size makes them easy to conceal and they can be either thrown or used in melee.

Halberd: A halberd is a large pole-arm 6’ to 8’ in length, the head of which has a long spike with an axe blade on one side and a hook on the reverse side.

Hammer, Throwing: A throwing hammer is a one handed hammer from 18” to 2’ in length that is weighted for throwing. Despite the name, it can also be used in melee.

Hammer, War: A war hammer is a large one handed hammer, usually 2’ to 3’ in length. The head of a war hammer is often symmetrical to aid in balance.

Javelin: A javelin is a light one- handed throwing spear. Although primarily used as a thrown weapon, it can also be used in melee.

Lance: A lance is an extremely long spear, 9’ to 12’ long. It is too unwieldy to use on foot, and can only be used when mounted—in which case it can be used in one hand despite its length.

Mace: A mace is a one handed melee weapon consisting of a 2’-3’ long shaft with a heavy metal head. The head can be smooth (round or pear shaped), can contain flanges or studs, or can even be sculpted into the shape of a fist or skull or other roundish object.

Net: Nets designed for use in combat are generally 6’ to 9’ in diameter, and usually have small weights around their edge to hold them open when they are flung. This arrangement lets them be thrown one-handed if held in their centre. Nets do no damage to opponents in combat, but are excellent defensive weapons.

Pike: A pike is an extremely long spear, 7’ to 15’ long. It can only be wielded using two hands.

Pistol: A pistol is a short gun, 9” to 12” long. It can be fired using only one hand, but needs both hands to reload. Pistols require both bullets as ammunition and red powder to fire them.

Poleaxe: A poleaxe consists of an axe blade (usually single sided, but occasionally double sided) with a 6’ to 8’ long shaft. It is wielded in both hands like a large two-handed axe.

Shield, Horned: A horned shield is a small (1’) buckler (strap-on shield) with a horn, spike or blade protruding from the centre at right angles to the shield. It is primarily used for attacking, and does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Shield, Knife: A knife shield is a small (1’) buckler (strap-on shield) with a knife blade protruding from either side, at right angles to the arm. It is primarily used for attacking, and does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Shield, Sword: A sword shield is a medium sized (1’) buckler (strap-on shield) with a sword or spear blade protruding from the end, parallel to the wielder’s arm so that it sticks out from behind their hand. It is primarily used for attacking, and does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Shield, Tusked: A tusked shield is a large hold-out shield, with spikes all around the edge and a spike protruding from the centre. This heavy shield must be used in two hands, and it does not provide a normal shield bonus; only an AC bonus based on proficiency level.

Sling: A sling is a long (4’ to 6’) leather cord with a pouch half way along. The wielder straps one end of the cord around their wrist and holds the other end in the same hand. They then place a lead pellet in the pouch and swing the cord over their head. At the mid-point of the swing, they let go of the loose end, which releases the pellet. Slings normally require pellets as ammunition, although they can be used with stones taken from the ground, albeit with a –1 penalty on to-hit and damage rolls.

Smoothbore: A smoothbore is a long gun, 3’ to 5’ long. It requires two hands to both fire and reload. Smoothbores require both bullets as ammunition and red powder to fire them.

Spear: A spear is a 5’ to 7’ long shaft with a stabbing blade on the end. Despite its length, a spear is a well balanced weapon and can either be used in melee one-handed or thrown.

Staff: A staff is one of the most simple weapons. It consists of just a length of wood 5’ to 7’ in length, which is wielded in two hands.

Sword, Bastard: A bastard sword, also known as a longsword, is a sword with a long (3’ to 4’) narrow blade that is used either one-handed or two-handed. The same weapon proficiency covers both forms of usage.

Sword, Normal: A normal sword is a one-handed sword with a straight or curved blade 2’ to 3’ long. This category of sword encompasses a variety of different styles of sword, ranging from scimitars to broadswords and even rapiers.

Sword, Short: A short sword is a sword with a straight 18” to 2’ blade. Primarily used as a stabbing rather than slashing weapon, this small blade can be used in one hand.

Sword, Two-Handed: A two-handed sword, sometimes known as a greats- word, is a large and heavy sword with a 4’ to 5’ blade. It is always used in two hands.

Trident: A trident is a short (4’ to 6’) spear which is split at the end into three tines, like a fork. Each tine is usually barbed. A trident is used in one hand either in melee or as a thrown weapon, and is often used as a fishing spear, since the barbs on the points can lift the fish out of the water when the trident is withdrawn.

Whip: A whip is a woven leather cord from 5’ to 15’ in length that is used in one hand. Whips do little damage, and are more often used for corporal punishment than for serious combat.

Armour

Armour is toughened clothing, made out of leather or metal, that protects its wearer. In game terms, this reduces the armour class of the character wearing it from the default value of 9 to a better (i.e. lower) value. This value may be further adjusted by dexterity or magical factors, or by use of a shield. Although armour is made from a variety of pieces—from vambraces and greaves through to helmets and gauntlets— armour in Dark Dungeons is assumed to come in sets. Two sets of chain mail are considered to be the same, even if one consists of a chain shirt, chain trews and a coif whereas the other consists of a chain hauberk with leather vambraces and a steel helmet.

Since most people making armour— and especially those making magical armour—will be doing so for customers of different races, most armour is made with straps and so forth that can adjust it to fit wearers of differing size. Therefore all humans and demihumans can wear the same armour. Similarly, most humanoids of approximately the same human to halfling size range can also wear the same armour.

Item Armour Class Weight Shield -1 to AC 100cn Leather Armour 7 200cn Scale Mail 6 300cn Chain Mail 5 400cn Banded Mail 4 450cn Plate Mail 3 500cn Suit Armour 0 750cn

Table 8-3: Armour

Cost

Notes 10gp

Useable by Druids 20gp

Useable by Druids and Thieves 30gp 40gp 50gp 60gp 250gp

See Description

Table 8-4: Pack and Riding Animals

Item Carrying Capacity Speed Cost Camel 3,000cn 50’/rnd 100gp Donkey 2,000cn 30’/rnd 20gp Horse (Draft) 4,500cn 30’/rnd 40gp Horse (Riding) 3,000cn 80’/rnd 75gp Horse (War) 4,000cn 40’/rnd 250gp Mule 3,000cn 40’/rnd 30gp Pony 2,000cn 70’/rnd 35gp

Table 8-5: Land Transport Equipment

Item

Carrying Capacity

Weight

Cost

Saddle and Tack

200cn

300cn

25gp

Saddle Bags

800cn

100cn

5gp

Trap (1 donkey/mule/pony)

2,000cn

-

50gp

Cart (1 horse or 2 mules/ponies)

4,000cn

-

100gp

Cart (2 horses or 4 mules/ponies)

8,000cn

-

100gp

Wagon (2 horses)

15,000cn

-

200gp

Wagon (4 horses)

25,000cn

-

200gp

Banded Mail: This is a suit primarily composed of chain mail with horizontal metal strips fastened into the mail. Banded mail gives a character an armour class of 4. It doesn’t quite have the protection of plate mail, but is cheaper and lighter.

Chain Mail: This is a suit primarily composed of small metal rings that are linked together to form a flexible protective material. Chain mail gives a character an armour class of 5.

Leather Armour: This is a suit primarily composed of leather plates and strips. The leather is often boiled in wax to harden it. Leather armour gives an armour class of 7, and because it is made from natural materials it can be worn by druids. It is also light and quiet enough to be worn by thieves.

Plate Mail: This is a suit primarily composed of large metal plates—the largest being the breastplate—linked together with chain mail. Plate mail gives a character an armour class of 3.

It is the best armour that can be bought second hand or looted, since suit armour must be custom made.

Scale Mail: This is a suit primarily composed of leather plates that have metal scales or studs sewn onto them for added protection. Scale mail gives a character an armour class of 6.

Shield: A shield is a large solid piece of wood or metal that is either held in one hand or strapped to one arm. It is used to parry melee attacks and provide cover from missile attacks. A shield is normally used in conjunction with armour and provides and extra bonus of –1 to the character’s armour class. If used without other armour, a shield provides a bonus of –1 to a character’s natural armour class of 9, for a total armour class of 8. Wooden shields may be used by druids, since they are made of natural materials.

Suit Armour: This is a suit primarily composed of overlapping metal plates, with chain mail underneath.

Table 8-6: Barding

Item

Armour Class

Weight

Cost

Leather Barding Scale Barding Chain Barding Banded Barding Plate Barding Field Barding Joust Barding

Also known as jousting plate, suit armour must be specially made to fit its owner—and is often worn by nobility as a status symbol as much as for protection. However, it does provide more protection than any other (nonmagical) armour. Suit armour gives a character an armour class of 0, and also reduces all damage done to the character by area effect attacks (such as Fireball spells and dragon’s breath) by one point per die of damage. If the suit armour is magical, it reduces such damage by an additional point per two points of enhancement bonus.

Unfortunately, since suit armour is designed for tourney use and parades where the wearer spends their time on horseback, it is very bulky and noisy when worn on foot. When on foot, someone wearing suit armour can he heard moving up to 120’ away, negating any chance of surprise; and only has a 1 in 6 chance per round of being able to stand unaided if knocked prone.

Land Transport

Whether trekking across a desert, riding from city to city, or driving a caravan of wagons filled with a dragon’s hoard, adventurers often need land transport other than walking.

Pretty much all land transport is powered by animals, and the vast majority of these animals are horses and mules, ranging from the smallest pony to the largest draft horse.

The speeds listed in Table 8-4: Pack and Riding Animals are for the animals when carrying a load up to their listed carrying capacity. Animals can carry twice the listed load, but can only move at half the listed speed while doing so.

7 250cn 40gp 6 400cn 75gp 5 600cn 150gp 4 1,500cn 400gp 3 3,000cn 500gp 2 4,000cn 600gp 0 5,000cn 700gp

Animals pulling vehicles use the carrying capacity of the cart or wagon rather than their own capacity, and cannot be loaded whilst hitched to a vehicle in this manner. When pulling a vehicle, an animal moves at its normal speed when the vehicle is carrying up to its capacity and at half speed when the vehicle is carrying up to twice its capacity.

Banded Barding: This is a suit primarily composed of chain mail with horizontal metal strips fastened into the mail.

Banded barding gives an animal an armour class of 4, unless the animal’s armour class is already better than 4.

Camel: Camels are normally only found in desert or semi-desert environments where horses don’t fare well.

Cart: A medium sized two-wheeled vehicle pulled by one or more horses. A cart is designed for carrying cargo, and may optionally have a seat for a driver. If there is no seat, the horse must be led.

Chain Barding: This is a suit primarily composed of small metal rings that are linked together to form a flexible protective material. Chain barding gives an animal an armour class of 5, unless the animal’s armour class is already better than 5.

Donkey: Donkeys are rarely ridden, but they make a cheap—if somewhat stubborn and wilful—pack animal.

Field Barding: This is a suit primarily composed of large metal plates linked together with chain mail. The plates are heavier and more numerous than normal plate barding. Field barding gives an animal an armour class of 2, unless the animal’s armour class is already better than 2.

Horse (Draft): A large powerful horse, that sacrifices speed for strength and can carry heavy loads over long distances.

Horse (Riding): A typical horse, fast and light but easily spooked and not suitable for combat situations.

Horse (War): A large horse specially trained to not panic in combat situations.

Joust Barding: This is a suit primarily composed of overlapping metal plates that completely protect the front of the animal, to protect it from injury in jousting competitions. The plates are even heavier than field barding. Joust barding gives an animal an armour class of 0, unless the animal’s armour class is already better than 0.

Leather Barding: This is a suit primarily composed of leather plates and strips. The leather is often boiled in wax to harden it. Leather armour gives an animal an armour class of 7, unless the animal’s armour class is already better than 7.

Mule: A cross between a donkey and a horse, combining the best features of both. It is larger and stronger than a donkey, but smarter than a horse.

Plate Barding: This is a suit primarily composed of large metal plates linked together with chain mail. Plate barding gives an animal an armour class of 3, unless the animal’s armour class is already better than 3.

Pony: A small light horse that is cheaper to feed and easier to care for than other breeds of horse, but lacks their strength.

Saddle and Tack: A saddle, blanket, bridle and reins—everything needed to ride a horse safely. It is possible to ride a horse bareback without these items, but and Dex Checks made to control the horse will be made at a –3 to effective dexterity.

The 200cn carrying capacity of a saddle and tack does not refer to the weight of the rider, but to the weight that can be carried in the bags and pouches that come with it.

Saddle Bags: Saddle bags are long pairs of sacks sewn together at the top with a length of material. They are slung over a horse’s saddle so that one bag hangs down either side of the horse distributing the weight evenly.

Scale Barding: This is a suit primarily composed of leather plates that have metal scales or studs sewn onto them for added protection. Scale barding gives an animal an armour class of 6, unless the animal’s armour class is already better than 6.

Trap: A small two-wheeled vehicle with two seats, that is pulled by a single pony, mule or donkey. Although a trap can be used for transporting cargo, it is primarily designed as a means of personal transport.

Wagon: A large four-wheeled vehicle, pulled by a team of horses. Wagons are mostly used for cargo transport, although some travelling people live in them as an alternative to tents.

Sea Transport

For long distance travel, it is much more efficient to travel by boat than by land—and depending on the destination, land travel may not be possible.

If characters are travelling along an established route, they can book passage on an existing ship. If not, they may need to buy a ship and hire crew to sail it.

All ships and boats need skilled crew to sail them, and some also need unskilled rowers. If more than 5 crew are needed one of them must be a captain, and if more than 15 crew are needed one of them must be a captain and one of them must be a first mate.

Crew (and troops, if mentioned in the description) do not count towards a ship’s carrying capacity.

Barque: A barque is a three masted ocean going ship 100’-150’ long and 25’-30’ wide, with a draft of 10’-12’. There are raised decks at the fore and aft, and the ship can be fitted with up to two light catapults or cannons.

In addition to its crew, a barque may house 50 troops.

Item Weight Capacity Minimum Crew

Move per Day Cost Barque 400 tons 20,000cn 20 Crew 90

miles 20,000gp Canoe, River 1,000cn 6,000cn 1 Crew 18

miles 50gp Canoe, Sea 3,000cn 6,000cn 1 Crew 18

miles 100gp Galley* 50 tons 10,000cn 10 Crew, 60

Row 90 miles 10,000gp Longship* 30 tons 15,000cn 75 Crew 90

miles 15,000gp Passage, Average -6,000cn 1sp/5 miles Passage, Basic -1,500cn 1sp/20 miles Passage, Luxury -15,000cn 1sp/mile Passage, Skysailing -15,000cn

1gp/mile Quinquireme 120 tons 60,000cn 30 Crew,

300 Row 72 miles 60,000gp Raft, Professional 5,000cn 10,000cn -12

miles 100gp Raft, Scavenged 5,000cn 5,000cn -12

miles - River Barge* 10 tons40,000cn 2 Crew, 8

Row 36 miles 4,000gp Rowing Boat* 5,000cn 1,000cn -18 miles

1,000gp Sail of Skysailing 500cn 100 tons 1

Spell caster Varies 200,000gp Skiff* 5 tons 20,000cn 1 Crew 72 miles

3,000gp Sloop* 70 tons 5,000cn 10 Crew 72 miles

5,000gp Trireme* 80 tons 30,000cn 20 Crew, 180

Row 72 miles 30,000gp Troopship 400 tons 30,000cn 20 Crew 54

miles 30,000gp

Table 8-7: Ships and Boats

Sail of Skysailing 1 ton = 20,000cn

Canoe, River: A canoe is a small boat 15’ long and 3’ wide with a 1’ draft. A canoe is normally made of waxed canvas or hides stretched over a wooden frame, and has one or two seats. Canoes are designed for use in rivers and swamps, and can easily be carried across land. A canoe weighs 1,000cn if carried—but two people can share the weight.

Canoe, Sea: A sea canoe is a small boat 15’ long and 3’ wide with a 1’ draft, with one or two floats held out either side for stability. A sea canoe is normally made of waxed canvas or hides stretched over a wooden frame, and has one or two seats. Sea canoes are designed for use in coastal waters, and can be carried across land.

A canoe weighs 3,000cn if carried—but two to four people can share the weight.

Galley: A galley is an ocean-going ship 60’-100’ long and 10’-15’ wide with a 2’-3’ draft. Because of its small

draft, it can travel along rivers as long as they are wide enough for it.

The listed speed is for the galley

under sail.

If becalmed, it can be rowed at 18mi/ day. A galley has a single line of

rowers.

A galley can be fitted with a light

ship’s ram (at a cost of 3,000gp) and up to two light catapults or cannons.

In addition to its crew, and rowers it will normally house 20 troops.

Longship: A longship is a single masted boat 60’-80’ long and 10’-15’ wide, with a 2’-3’ draft. It is

designed for troop transport along rivers and coasts. The 75 crew normally act as both rowers and troops when necessary.

The listed speed is for the longship under sail. If becalmed, it can be

rowed at 18mi/day.

Passage, Average: Average passage includes a small shared cabin that can hold up to 1,000cn plus the character, basic meals, and an additional 5,000cn of hold space.

Passage, Basic: Basic passage includes a bunk in a shared hold with space for 500cn plus the character, no meals unless the character brings their own food or pays for ship’s food

separately, and 1,000cn of hold space.

Table 8-8: Buildings

Item

Arrow Slit 10gp Barbican 37,000gp Battlement (100’) 500gp Building, Stone 3,000gp Building, Wood 1,500gp Door (Secret) Cost x5 Door, Exterior (Iron/Stone) 100gp Door, Interior (Iron/Stone) 50gp Door, Interior (Reinforced) 20gp Door, Interior (Wood) 10gp Drawbridge 250gp Dungeon Corridor 500gp Floor, Flagstone 100gp Floor, Tile 100gp Floor, Wood 40gp Gate, Wooden 1,000gp Gatehouse 6,500gp Keep, Square 75,000gp Moat, Filled 800gp Moat, Unfilled 400gp Shifting Wall 1,000gp Shutters (Window) 5gp Staircase, Stone 60gp Staircase, Wood 20gp Tower, Bastion 9,000gp Tower, Round Large 30,000gp Tower, Round Small 15,000gp Trap Door Cost x2 Wall, Castle 5,000gp Wall, Wood 1,000gp Window, Barred 20gp Window, Open 10gp

Cost

Passage, Luxury: Luxury passage includes a spacious private cabin that can store up to 5,000cn plus the

character, excellent meals, and an additional 10,000cn of hold space.

Passage, Skysailing: Skysailing passage is passage on a ship equipped with a Sail of Skysailing which enables it

to fly at great speed. This price is for

atmospheric travel only. Voidspeed travel is charged at 100gp/day in addition to the mileage to the edge of the atmosphere.

Quinquirime: A quinquirime is an ocean-going ship 120’-150’ long and 20’-30’ wide with a 4’-6’ draft.

Because of its width, it cannot usually travel along rivers.

The listed speed is for the quinquirime under sail. If becalmed, it can be

rowed at 12mi/day by five tiers of rowers.

A quinquirime includes a heavy ship’s ram and fore and aft towers. It can be fitted with up to three light catapults

or cannons. In addition to its crew, it

will normally house 75 troops.

Raft: A raft is a flat platform 10’

long and 10’ wide, with a 3”-6” draft. A

raft is the most basic of vessels, and is

normally limited to swamps, lakes and slow moving rivers. Up to 12 rafts can be lashed together to make a single larger raft with proportionally higher

carrying capacity.

River Barge: A river barge is a flat- bottomed sail-less boat 20’-30’ long

and 10’ wide with a 2’-3’ draft. It is

normally used for carrying cargo up and down slow moving rivers.

Rowing Boat: A rowing boat is a small sail-less boat 20’ long and 4’-5’ wide, with a 1’-2’ draft. Rowing boats are often stored on larger ships and used

to transport people to and from shore or, in an emergency, used as lifeboats. Each rowing boat stored in this manner takes up 5,000cn of its parent ship’s capacity.

Sail of Skysailing: A sail of

skysailing is a magical sail made chiefly from the silk of phase spiders. Sails of

skysailing can be attached to most boats and ships that weigh 100 tons or less,

although some very small boats such as rafts and canoes are unsuitable as they have nowhere to fasten it.

When fitted to a new ship for the first time, the sail must be left in place

for a week in order to attune to that ship. During that time, the sail changes shape to fit the rigging of the ship.

Once attunement has taken place, the sails can be hoist (on that individual ship) or stowed repeatedly without losing the attunement. However, a Sail of Skysailing can only be attuned to one ship at a time, and cannot be used on a different ship—not even one of the same design—without being re- attuned.

See Chapter 12: Into the Wider World

for detailed rules on using sails of

skysailing to fly a ship.

Skiff: A skiff is a single masted boat 15’-45’ long and 5’-15’ wide with a

3’-8’ draft. It is designed for lakes and coastal waters, and can sometimes be too deep keeled for river use.

Skiffs are commonly used as fishing boats.

Sloop: A sloop is a one or two masted ocean going ship 60’-80’ long and

20’30’ wide, with a draft of 5’-8’. There may be a raised deck at the aft.

In addition to its crew, a sloop may house 25 troops.

Trireme: A trireme is an ocean-going ship 120’-150’ long and 15’-20’ wide with a 3’ draft. Because of its small draft, it can travel along rivers as

long as they are wide enough for it.

The listed speed is for the trireme

under sail. If becalmed, it can be rowed at 18mi/day by three tiers of rowers.

A trireme can be fitted with a heavy ship’s ram (at a cost of 10,000gp) and up to two light catapults or cannons.

In addition to its crew, it will normally house 50 troops.

Troopship: A troopship is a three masted ocean going ship 100’-150’ long and 25’-30’ wide, with a draft of

10’12’. The hull is the same as that of a large sailing ship, but the ship has

been converted to carry the maximum number of troops. A troopship often has large fold-down doors on its sides so that troops—often including cavalry— can rapidly exit.

In addition to its crew, a troopship

will normally house 100 troops.

Buildings & Dungeons

When characters get to higher levels, they may wish to settle down. Whether taking over and repairing an existing structure, or starting from scratch; building work is expensive.

The prices for buildings all include

the cost of the unskilled and semi-skilled labour that does the building, but do not include the cost of skilled

architects and engineers.

Buildings take one day per 500gp (or part of 500gp) total cost, and need one engineer on site to oversee the

building process per 100,000gp (or part of 100,000gp) total cost.

The listed costs assume that the

building is being built as an outpost in a remote but not inaccessible region. If

a building is being built in an

inaccessible region, double the costs—and if a building is being built in a heavily

settled region halve the costs.

Often a building—particularly one with an unusual purpose such as a temple— will require features of custom size,

for example larger doors than normal.

The prices of these features should be based on the standard prices for

similar features and increased or decreased proportionally.

Arrow Slit: A narrow window designed to let defenders shoot out whilst not exposing them to returning fire.

Barbican: A pair of 30’ tall x 20’ wide towers flanking a 20’ square gatehouse built as a single unit. Price includes

iron portcullis.

Battlement (100’): 100’ of crenellated wall with a parapet behind it. The

price only includes the crenellations and parapet, not the wall that the

battlement is on.

Building, Stone: A two story stone building, such as a large stone house, stables, or an inn.

Building, Wood: A two story wooden building, such as a large wooden house, stables, or an inn.

Door (Secret): A door that is disguised and hidden so that it will not be

noticed unless searched for.

Door, Exterior (Iron/Stone): A heavy exterior double-door, 7’ tall by

6’ wide.

Door, Interior (Iron/Stone): A heavy internal door, 7’ tall and 3’ wide.

Door, Interior (Reinforced): A wooden internal door reinforced with iron bands, 7’ tall and 3’ wide.

Door, Interior (Wood): A standard wooden internal door, 7’ tall and 3’ wide.

Drawbridge: A 10’ wide, 20’ long

reinforced wooden bridge that can be raised or lowered.

Dungeon Corridor: A 10’ x 10’ x 10’ section dug out from rock. The cost is multiplied by the depth of the dungeon (in multiples of 50’), for example

digging a 10’ x 10’ x 10’ section at a depth of 150’ will cost triple the listed

price: 1,500gp.

Floor, Flagstone: A 10’ x 10’ section of floor covered in flagstones.

Floor, Tile: A 10’ x 10’ section of

floor covered in tiles.

Floor, Wood: A 10’ x 10’ floor covered in polished fitted wood.

Gate, Wooden: A 20’ tall by 10’ wide wooden gate, reinforced and barred, suitable for putting in a stockade

wall.

Gatehouse: A 30’ high building 20’x20’ in area. Price includes iron portcullis.

Keep, Square: A heavily reinforced stone building 80’ tall and 60’ x 60’

in area.

Moat, Filled: 100’ length of 10’ deep, 20’ wide canal.

Moat, Unfilled: 100’ length of 10’ deep, 20’ wide ditch.

Shifting Wall: A 10’ x 10’ wall which has a counterbalance and mechanism for moving it.

Shutters (Window): Window shutters that provide little military defence,

but protect against bad weather.

Staircase, Stone: A stone staircase 3’ wide with a 10’ ascent.

Staircase, Wood: A wooden staircase 3’ wide with a 10’ ascent.

Tower, Bastion: A half-circle tower, 30’ tall and 30’ diameter.

Tower, Round Large: A 30’ tall, 30’ diameter round tower.

Tower, Round Small: A 30’ tall, 20’

Table 8-8: Hirelings

Class and Level

Cost per Mission*

Commoner

50gp

Cleric (1st)

150gp

Cleric (2nd)

300gp

Cleric (3rd)

600gp

Cleric (4th)

1,200gp

Cleric (5th)

2,500gp

Dwarf (1st)

220gp

Dwarf (2nd)

440gp

Dwarf (3rd)

880gp

Dwarf (4th)

1,700gp

Dwarf (5th)

3,500gp

Elf (1st)

400gp

Elf (2nd)

800gp

Elf (3rd)

1,600gp

Elf (4th)

3,200gp

Elf (5th)

6,400gp

Fighter (1st)

200gp

Fighter (2nd)

400gp

Fighter (3rd)

800gp

Fighter (4th)

1,600gp

Fighter (5th)

3,200gp

Halfling (1st)

200gp

Halfling (2nd)

400gp

Halfling (3rd)

800gp

Halfling (4th)

1,600gp

Halfling (5th)

3,200gp

Magic-User (1st)

250gp

Magic-User (2nd)

500gp

Magic-User (3rd)

1,000gp

Magic-User (4th)

2,000gp

Magic-User (5th)

4,000gp

Mystic (1st)

200gp

Mystic (2nd)

400gp

Mystic (3rd)

800gp

Mystic (4th)

1,600gp

Mystic (5th)

3,200gp

Thief (1st)

120gp

Thief (2nd)

240gp

Thief (3rd)

480gp

Thief (4th)

960gp

Thief (5th)

2,000gp

diameter round tower.

Trap Door: a 5’ x 5’ section of false floor with an opening mechanism that allows it to drop anyone standing on it through a hole in the floor.

Mercenary Type

Archer Cavalry, Heavy Cavalry, Light Cavalry, Medium Crossbowman Footman, Heavy Footman, Light Horse Archer Longbowman Militia

Table 8-9: Mercenaries

Human Cost

Dwarf Cost

Elf Cost

Goblin Cost

Orc Cost

5gp/month

-

10gp/month

2gp/month

3gp/month

20gp/month

-

-

-

-

10gp/month

-

20gp/month

-

-

15gp/month

-

-

-

-

4gp/month

6gp/month

-

-

2gp/month

3gp/month

5gp/month

6gp/month

-

15sp/month

2gp/month

-

4gp/month

5sp/month

1gp/month

15gp/month

-

30gp/month

-

-

10gp/month

-

20gp/month

-

-

1gp/month

-

-

-

-

Pony Crossbowman

-

15gp/month

-

-

-

Wolf Rider

-

-

Wall, Castle: 100’ length of 20’ tall

and 5’ thick reinforced stone wall, with a walkway and battlements on the top.

Wall, Wood: 100’ length of 20’ tall and 5’ thick reinforced wooden wall, with a walkway on the top.

Window, Barred: A 3’ x 1’ window with bars to prevent ingress and

egress.

Window, Open: A 3’ x 1’ open window.

Services

Whether looking for hired help to take out a goblin’s lair, or looking for

crew to accompany you on a sea voyage, or looking for people to manage your estates, or even looking for a cleric

to raise your friend; adventurers need the services of others. Employees of the characters come in three types— Hirelings, Mercenaries and Specialists.

-

5gp/month

-

Hirelings

Hirelings are adventurers (or would-be adventurers) willing to temporarily

join a party for a mission.

Although hirelings travel with—and adventure with—a party, they are not equal party members. They view the party as employers rather than

companions, and may desert or even rebel against their employers if maltreated

or exposed to excessive danger. See

Chapter 10: Combat for details of morale.

Since parties are prone to argument and internal disagreements, hirelings are normally employed by—and follow the orders of—a single designated “party leader”.

This will normally be the party member with the highest charisma. See Chapter

3: Basic Game Concepts for details on how charisma affects the employment of hirelings. Hirelings will not

normally obey suicidal orders or allow

themselves to be used as “trap detectors”. They are there to help out in fights

and to help in transporting supplies and loot, not to act as monster fodder. Getting the right hirelings can be a tricky business. On the one hand a party will want to hire competent help who are likely to survive the adventure and prove useful, but on the other hand there is both a cost consideration and also the consideration that

particularly competent adventurers are likely to be interested in adventuring on

their own rather than seeking employment with an existing group, since that is much more lucrative.

Although exact details may vary

depending on the campaign world, a useful rule of thumb is that hirelings that are available will range from commoners to adventurers of half the level of the party leader (rounded down, but with a minimum of first level and a maximum of fifth level).

They can be hired for a single

adventure for a cost in gold of a tenth of the experience that a character of their class would need for the level above theirs (or 50gp for a commoner), or for an extended expedition into the

wilderness for that cost per month. The party are expected to provide whatever equipment or mounts are needed by the hirelings, and they will expect

half payment in advance.

Example: A party whose leader is fifth

level wishes to employ some hirelings to

accompany them on a mission to drive out an orc

encampment that has been raiding in the local

area.

Since the party leader is fifth level,

hirelings of up to 2nd level will be available.

A 2nd level thief needs a total of

2,400xp to reach 3rd level, that 2nd level thief

would demand payment of a tenth of that in

gold—

i.e. 240gp. A 2nd level magic-user, on

the other hand, would need 5,000xp to reach

3rd level, that 2nd level magic-user would

demand payment of a tenth of that in gold—i.e. 500gp. Hirelings do not normally expect a share of treasure or magic items over and above their pay, although if given (or promised) such a share then their morale will be higher. Hirelings who are given magic items to test will

expect to be allowed to keep those magic items as payment for the dangers

involved in testing them.

Mercenaries

If characters need an entire army, rather than just a few helpers, they

can hire mercenaries. Mercenaries are trained troops that will work and fight for pay. The cost for mercenaries of different types are listed in Table 8-

9. The listed costs are for peacetime guarding and patrolling duties. For active war-time duties, double all

costs.

When hiring mercenaries, they are

assumed to come with captains and other leaders as part of the cost.

Mercenaries provide their own equipment when first hired, but if garrisoned for an extended period their employer is expected to provide armourers and blacksmiths to repair and maintain

their equipment.

Archer: First level fighters (or racial equivalent) armed with short bows and swords and wearing leather armour.

Cavalry, Heavy: First level fighters armed with swords and lances and wearing plate armour, riding war horses in plate barding.

Cavalry, Light: First level fighters

(or racial equivalent) armed with lances

and wearing leather armour, riding war horses in leather barding.

Cavalry, Medium: First level fighters (or racial equivalent) armed with

lances and wearing chain mail armour, riding war horses in chain barding.

Crossbowman: First level fighters (or racial equivalent) armed with heavy crossbows and wearing chain mail

armour.

Footman, Heavy: First level fighters (or racial equivalent) armed with swords and shields and wearing chain mail armour.

Footman, Light: First level fighters (or racial equivalent) armed with swords and shields and wearing leather armour.

Horse Archer: First level fighters (or racial equivalent) armed with short bows, riding normal horses.

Longbowman: First level fighters (or racial equivalent) armed with longbows and swords and wearing chain mail armour.

Militia: Commoners armed with spears.

Pony Crossbowman: First level dwarves armed with crossbows and riding ponies.

Wolf Rider: Goblins armed with spears and wearing leather armour, riding dire wolves.

Specialists

Sometimes a character will need the help of a different kind of specialist. Maybe they need an engineer to oversee the building of a large castle, maybe they need a scribe to write their

memoires, or maybe they just need a cleric to raise a dead party member.

All of these situations require the

character to employ a skilled specialist of some kind or another.

Specialists will not expose themselves to danger, and will not accompany characters on adventures.

The costs for different types of

specialists are listed in Table 8-10. Any

specialist not listed in this table (for example a leatherworker or a scribe) should be assumed to have a cost of 5gp/ month if skilled or 2gp/month if

unskilled.

Animal Trainer: An animal trainer domesticates and trains unusual

animals.

An animal trainer is not required for horses, mules, donkeys or dogs, but other animals can only be taught “tricks” by an animal trainer, who can handle up to six creatures of the same species at a time. The length of time needed to train an animal will depend on the animal type, but a month is

average.

Armourer: An armourer makes and repairs armour. One armourer is needed per 50 troops, whether the troops are conscripted or mercenaries.

Artillerist: An artillerist is usually

a fighter (or racial equivalent class) of

3rd to 5th level, who is in charge of the placement, maintenance and operation of siege weapons.

Bailiff: A bailiff is an official who looks after part or all of a castle,

and makes sure that that part of the

stronghold is in good repair.

Blacksmith: A blacksmith extracts pure iron from iron ore and makes steel.

Sometimes a blacksmith will also make simple metal goods; other times the blacksmith will simply make ingots of metal that other craftsmen will use.

Table 8-10: Specialists

Specialist Type

Animal Trainer 500gp/month Armourer 100gp/month Artillerist 750gp/month Bailiff 5gp/month Blacksmith 25gp/month Castellan 2,000gp/month Chamberlain 5gp/month Chaplain 500gp/month Chemist 1,000gp/month Chief Magistrate 2,000gp/month Engineer 750gp/month Equerry 5gp/month Guard Captain 4,000gp/month Herald 400gp/month Magist 3,000gp+/month Marshal 5gp/month Provost 5gp/month Reeve 500gp/month Rower 2gp/month Sage 2,000gp/month Sailor 10gp/month Seneschal 4,000gp/month Sheriff 5gp/month Ship’s Captain 250gp/month Ship’s Nagivator 150gp/month Spellcaster for Single Spell Special Steward 1,000gp/month Warden 5gp/month

Cost

Castellan: A castellan is usually a fighter (or racial equivalent class) of

5th to 9th level, and is in overall charge

of the military aspects of a stronghold.

Chamberlain: A chamberlain is in charge of cleaning and cooking staff in a stronghold.

Chaplain: A chaplain is a cleric who works full-time at a stronghold looking after the chapel and performing

religious services. Unlike clerics who work in independent temples around a

dominion, the chaplain is salaried rather than living on donations and tithes.

Chemist: A chemist is a non-spellcaster who studies alchemy, and may make potions like a magic-user, but takes twice the time and cost to do so.

Chief Magistrate: A chief magistrate is in charge of justice within the

dominion of a stronghold, and oversees the common magistrates and sheriffs.

Engineer: An engineer oversees the design and construction of buildings, roads, bridges, and other large scale structures. One engineer is needed per 100,000gp cost of a building project.

Equerry: An equerry is in charge of the stables, and is a specialised form

of bailiff.

Guard Captain: A guard captain is usually a fighter (or racial

equivalent) of 8th level or higher, and is in charge

of both the rulers personal guard and the guarding of the stronghold.

Herald: A herald is in charge of making announcements, and also in charge of maintaining up to date news about (and coats of arms of) the rulers of nearby dominions. A herald also acts as an advisor on matters of etiquette.

Magist: A magist is a magic-user (or racial equivalent class) of 9th level

or higher who acts as an advisor on

magical affairs.

Marshal: A marshal is a fighter (or racial equivalent class) who is in

charge of recruiting and training troops.

Provost: A provost collects taxes.

Reeve: A reeve is in charge of

bookkeeping and accounts within a stronghold.

Rower: A rower is an unskilled seaman who rows in a galley.

Sage: A sage is an advisor who

specialises in history and lore.

Sailor: A sailor is skilled at

operating and maintaining ships and boats.

Seneschal: A seneschal, sometimes called a Vizier, is a ruler by proxy

who speaks for the actual ruler of the

dominion when the ruler is absent or when the ruler does not wish to bother with a particular matter.

Sheriff: A sheriff is responsible for

law enforcement in an area of dominion.

Ship’s Captain: A ship’s captain is in charge of the wellbeing of a ship and

its crew.

Ship’s Navigator: A ship’s navigator is in charge of ensuring a ship follows

the correct course and getting it back on course if there have been problems.

Spellcaster for Single Spell: Sometimes a character doesn’t need to employ a spellcaster over a long term. They simply need a single spell cast, whether it is to identify a magic item

or to raise a dead companion back to life.

The issues involved in this vary

depending on the type of caster. Clerics vary from religion to religion. While some secretive cults will simply refuse to cast spells for outsiders (or will

only do so if paid in a similar manner to magic-users), the clerics of most

mainstream religions are dedicated to good works and spreading the popularity of their religion. As such, they will

generally cast spells for free, especially if it

is for something they consider to be a good cause.

However, the problem is availability rather than cost—particularly for

healing (and raising) clerical spells or others that would compete for the same spell slots. There may be a waiting list for such spells, as locals also need them.

A few clerics may accept a bribe to push adventurers to the front of the queue, but most will not since their own lay members and followers come first.

When trying to get a spell cast by a mainstream cleric, roll 1d8 and consult the list below:

There is no cleric who 0 or less = can (or is willing to) cast the spell at this time.

There is a long queue of people wanting the spell.

1-2 =

It will be available after 3d6 days.

There is a queue of people wanting the spell.

3-4 =

It will be available after 1d6 days.

Spell is used up or not 5-6 = learned, but will be available the following day.

7 or more = Spell is available immediately.

Most of the time, the size of the

temple or chapel will not affect the roll,

since larger temples have more (and higher level) clerics but also serve greater numbers of lay worshippers.

However, if there is a particular

reason for a high level cleric to be in a

small temple, the roll should get a +1 bonus; and if there is a particular reason for

a large temple to have a shortage of high level clerics then the roll should get

a -1 penalty. Similarly, if the desired

spell is 2nd level or lower the roll should get

a +1 bonus and if the desired spell is

5th level or higher the roll should get a

-1 penalty with an additional –1 penalty

if the spell is 7th level.

Magic-users and elves, on the other hand, tend to set artificially high

prices in order to not be constantly disturbed with petty requests. Generally, this

will be a cost of 10gp/caster level for each consultation (whether that results in a spell being cast or not). Druids set

similar prices, but will generally be

interested in an equivalent value of goods, since they have little use for money.

Steward: A steward is in charge of household affairs at a stronghold,

including housekeeping, maintaining food supplies, and so forth.

Warden: A warden is a military advisor subordinate to the castellan and is

responsible for the defences of a particular area within the dominion or stronghold.

Siege Weaponry

Siege weaponry is, naturally enough, used when besieging a stronghold. However, it can also be used

defensively firing from the stronghold itself or even used in naval warfare. Full

rules for siege combat are found in Chapter

14: War! Ballista: A ballista is a large

crossbow mounted on a sturdy platform. It fires bolts that are the size of spears. It

is most commonly used to shoot into formations of troops, as the spears are of little use against fortifications. A ballista on wheels can be pulled by a single horse, mule or pony.

Battering Ram: A large heavy post or log that is usually used to break down wooden walls or doors.

Table 8-11: Siege Weaponry

Item

Weight

Artillerists

Other Crew

Range

Damage

Fire Rate

AC

Hit Points

Cost

Ammo Cost

Ballista

6,000cn

-

4

100/200/300

1d10+6

1/2 rnds

4

9

75gp

2,000gp/wk

Battering Ram

3,000cn

-

10

-

1d6+8

1/2 rnds

-4

50

100gp

-

Belfry

250,000cn

-

-

-

-

-

0

75

750gp

-

Bore

3,000cn

-

10

-

1d6+14

1/2 rnds

-4

50

150gp

-

Cannon

10,000cn

2

3

250/350/450

1d10+10

1/3 rnds

-4

75

1,000gp

12,000gp/wk

Catapult, Heavy

18,000cn

1

7

250/325/400*

1d10+10

1/6 rnds

0

27

250gp

6,000gp/wk

Catapult, Light

12,000cn

1

5

200/250/300*

1d8+8

1/5 rnds

4

18

150gp

4,000gp/wk

Gallery Shed

8,000cn

-

8

-

-

-

4

40

300gp

-

Hoist

12,000cn

-

6

-

-

-

4

15

150gp

-

Ladder

900cn

-

2

-

-

-

4

3

3gp

-

Mantlet

4,800cn

-

-

-

-

-

0

16

16gp

-

Light Ship’s Ram

-

-

-

-

3d8

-

-

-

3,000gp

-

Heavy Ship’s Ram

-

-

-

-

6d6

-

-

-

10,000g

-

Timber Fort

7,200cn

-

-

-

-

-

0

32

32gp

-

Trebuchet

24,000cn

1

11

250/400/500*

1d12+13

1/6 rnds

0

50

400gp

8,000gp/wk

minimum range of 150’ Ship’s Rams do

full

damage against other ships.

If it is mounted inside a belfry or

gal-

A light catapult can be towed by a sin-

A mantlet provides troops behind it

lery sled, it only needs half the

normal

gle horse, and a heavy catapult can be

with a –4 bonus to armour class.

crew.

towed by a pair of horses.

Ship’s Ram: A ship’s ram is like a bat-

Belfry: A portable tower 30’ tall with

a

Gallery Shed: A gallery shed is a

tering ram, except fastened to the

front

drawbridge at the top and a door at the

wooden frame with side walls and a

of a ship below the water line, offset

to

bottom, connected by an internal stair-

roof but no end walls. It is used to ei

either side. The ship attacks by ram-

case. The belfry is pushed up to the

ther give cover to troops, allowing

ming its target with a glancing blow,

so

that the ship’s itself doesn’t get

signifi

walls of a fortification and then the

them to get close to a fortification,

or

drawbridge is lowered so that it rests

to house a battering ram or bore. A

cantly damaged by impacting the en-

on top of those walls. Troops climb the

gallery shed provides troops inside it

emy vessel with force, but the ram

stairs and cross the drawbridge onto

with a –12 bonus to armour class.

scrapes along the enemy’s hull as the

the fortification walls. A belfry needs

to

two ships pass. Ship’s rams do full

dam-

be pulled by a team of four horses or

Hoist: A hoist is a small platform fas

age to other ships.

pushed by 20 humans. A belfry pro

tened to a 30’ tall pole which rests on

a

vides troops inside it with a –8 bonus

mobile base. It is pushed towards the

Timber Fort: A timber fort is a num

to armour class.

wall of a fortification, and then elite

ber of 8’ long and 5’ high sections of

wooden palisade that can be carried on

troops stand on the platform while the

Bore: A bore is a large drill hung from

crew pull it to the top of the pole by

a wagon and quickly deployed in the

chains like a battering ram. It is

pushed

means of a rope and pulley system.

field on order to provide cover from

against the side of a fortification and

Although it does not offer the protec

missiles. Once deployed, it cannot be

used to drill into the side of it,

weaken

tion that a belfry does, it is both

moved with any great speed.

ing it.

cheaper and far more portable.

A timber fort provides troops inside or

Cannon: A cannon is basically an over-

Ladder: This is simply a 30’ long nor-

behind it with a –8 bonus to armour

sized gun on wheels that shoots large

mal ladder that is put up against the

class.

iron balls rather than bullets.

Although

wall of a fortification and climbed.

lighter than catapults and trebuchets

Since it is very vulnerable to being

dis-

Trebuchet: A trebuchet is a long pole

with a sling on one end and a heavy

and requiring fewer untrained crew;

lodged or broken, it is normally only

cannons are expensive to make, require

used for either stealth attacks or

secon

weight on the other. The whole thing is

more trained crew, and require a steady

dary attacks while most wall defenders

mounted on a wheeled frame. The pole

supply of red powder to work.

are busy trying to fight off belfries

and

is pulled down so that the sling is

down

hoists.

to the ground and can be loaded, then

Catapult: A catapult consists of a

it is released—at which time the weight

frame containing a wooden pole with a

Mantlet: A mantlet is an 8’ long 4’

forces the pole to swing and the sling

basket or bowl on the end that is

pulled

high wooden palisade on wheels that

to fire the ammunition in the direction

back under tension and then quickly

up to five troops can use to shield

of the enemy.

released so that it springs forward

themselves from missile fire as they

within the frame hurling whatever was

advance towards a fortification.

put in the bowl towards the enemy.