Into The Wider World

Once adventurers have got some experience under their belts and they are practised in their chosen professions, they are likely to start venturing further afield from the civilised areas that they started in.

Sometimes this is due to increased bravery. Sometimes it is due to the lure of more lucrative opportunities.

Sometimes it is from sheer necessity as some task requires a long journey.

Regardless of the motivation, travelling and exploring in the wilderness away from civilised areas is a dangerous undertaking. Merchants and pilgrims who need to travel long distances tend to do so in well guarded caravans; and villages and farms don’t expand too far from the safety of strongholds.

Maps & Hexes

Just like dungeons, wilderness is usually mapped out in advance by the Game Master. How much of this map is known by the adventurers (and in how much detail) will vary from campaign to campaign. However, it is important that the Game Master has a reasonably accurate idea of where the adventurers are even if they don’t know themselves.

Although maps given to players (to represent the maps that their characters have access to) may be anywhere from scratching and doodles to fully fledged works of art, the master maps that a Game Master uses are often drawn on hex-paper.

Drawing maps on hex-paper makes it easier to keep scale consistent from map to map, and also makes it easier to track the adventurers’ movement.

The most common scale for such hex- maps is 8 miles per hex for maps of individual areas or countries, and 24 miles per hex for larger scale maps of continents and empires.

Overland Movement

Characters travelling overland normally do so either on foot or on mounts of some kind.

Table 12-1: Overland Movement (Miles)

Per-Day Movement Rate

Per-round Movement Rate Road Trail 10’ 9 miles 20’ 18 miles 30’ (e.g. Draft Horse) 27 miles 40’ (e.g. Human) 36 miles 50’ (e.g. Camel) 45 miles 60’ 54 miles 70’ (e.g. Pony) 63 miles 80’ (e.g. Riding Horse) 72 miles

Open Terrain

6 miles

12 miles

18 miles

24 miles

30 miles

36 miles

42 miles

48 miles

Broken Ground Desert Forest Hills Mud Snow Glaciers Jungle Mountain Swamp 4 miles 3 miles 8 miles 6 miles 12 miles 9 miles 16 miles 12 miles 20 miles 15 miles 24 miles 18 miles 28 miles 21 miles 32 miles 24 miles

Table 12-2: Overland Movement (8-Mile

Hexes)

Per-Day Movement Rate (Approximate)

Per-round Movement Rate

Road

Trail

10’

1 hex

20’

2 hexes

30’ (e.g. Draft Horse)

3.5 hexes 40’ (e.g. Human)

4.5 hexes 50’ (e.g. Camel)

5.5 hexes 60’

7 hexes

70’ (e.g. Pony)

8 hexes

80’ (e.g. Riding Horse)

9 hexes

Riding horses are the most common mount, but in desert environments camels may be more suitable—and characters with a lot to carry may prefer wagons or other vehicles.

The distance that a group can move in a day is based on the movement speed of the slowest member of the group.

On open terrain, a group or individual can move 60% of their per-round movement speed in miles.

For example, the movement rate of an unencumbered human is normally 40’ per round.

Broken Ground Desert Glaciers Open Terrain Forest Hills Jungle Mountain Mud Swamp Snow 1 hex 0.5 hexes 0.5 hexes 1.5 hexes 1 hex 1 hex 2.5 hexes 1.5 hexes 1 hex 3 hexes 2 hexes 1.5 hexes 4 hexes 2.5 hexes 2 hexes 4.5 hexes 3 hexes 2.5 hexes 5.5 hexes 3.5 hexes 2.5 hexes 6 hexes 4 hexes 3 hexes

Therefore, an unencumbered human can travel 24 miles per day on open terrain.

Difficult terrain such as desert, forest, hills, broken ground; or difficult weather conditions such as snow or heavy rain reduces this movement speed by a third, to 40% of their per- round movement speed in miles.

For example, the movement rate of an unencumbered human is normally 40’ per round. Therefore, an unencumbered human can travel 16 miles per day on difficult terrain.

Extreme terrain such as mountains, jungle, swamp or glaciers reduces the open terrain movement speed by half, to 30% of their per-round movement rate in miles.

Finally, paved roads increase movement speed by a half, to 90% of their per-round movement rate in miles, except in snow conditions; and established but unpaved trails increase movement speed by a half, to 90% of their per-round movement rate in miles, except in snow or heavy rain conditions.

Table 12-1 shows the movement rates (in miles per day) on each type of terrain for creatures with base speeds ranging from 10’/round to 80’/round; and table 12-2 shoes the approximate movement rates in standard 8-mile hexes (rounded to the nearest half hex) for the same creatures.

It is important to remember that the movement rates shown in those tables are for completely unencumbered people and are therefore unlikely to be reached by actual travellers.

Armoured humans will typically move at a speed of 20’ rather than 40’, and unarmoured humans carrying packs containing food and gear will typically move at a speed of 30’ rather than 40’. Similarly, although rider-less horses can move at 80’, a horse with a saddle and rider will typically move at a speed of only 40’.

See Chapter 8: Equipping for Adventure for more details on how encumbrance affects movement rates.

Mixed Terrain

Someone travelling on a mix of terrain during the same day travels at a rate governed by the majority of the terrain that they travelled across.

The sole exception to this (and this only happens in very rare circumstances) is that this method can sometimes result in someone travelling across more of a particular terrain type in a partial day than they normally could in a whole day, because they spent the majority of the day travelling on a much less difficult terrain.

In this rare case, the person’s travel distance over the more difficult terrain is limited to the amount they could normally travel on that terrain in a whole day.

Example: Black Leaf is leaving town in possession of a treasure map that she has found. The map shows a site to the north of a mountain pass.

According to the Game Master’s hex map, the place that is marked on Black Leaf’s map as the point at which to leave the road and start heading north is two and a half hexes away from the town.

With Black Leaf’s normal movement rate of 40’ per round, she can travel 4.5 hexes per day along the mountain pass (a road), and 1.5 hexes per day in the mountains. Since she is travelling two and a half hexes on the road before turning off, the majority of her day’s journey will be on the road and she therefore travels at her road speed—4.5 hexes per day.

However, this would take her along 2.5 hexes of road, followed by 2 hexes of mountains. In a whole day she can only travel across 1.5 hexes of mountains, so her movement in the mountain hexes is limited to this value.

Therefore at the end of the first day, she has travelled along two and a half hexes of road and one and a half hexes of mountain, and camps for the night half way through the second mountain hex.

Fatigue

Creatures that are travelling long distances must rest for a full day for every six days that they travel.

Failure to do so results in a cumulative –1 penalty to to-hit and damage rolls due to long term fatigue per six days (or part of six days) of continuous travel after the initial six.

This penalty is reduced by 1 for each full day of rest taken.

Example: Elfstar and Black Leaf are travelling to the capital. Unfortunately they have no horses, so they are travelling on foot.

Although Black Leaf is relatively unencumbered, Elfstar’s armour means that she moves at only 30’ per round.

The city is 240 miles away, and the Game Master is not using a hex map.

Given Elfstar’s movement rate, they pair can travel 27 miles per day. After six days of travelling, they have walked a total of 162 miles.

They now have a choice. They still have 78 miles to go, and at their walking speed this will take them another three days to walk.

They can press on, completing the whole journey in 9 days, but fatiguing themselves with a –1 penalty; or they can rest for a day before continuing. This will make the journey last an extra day, but they will not be fatigued when they arrive.

Black Leaf’s suggestion of a third option— stealing a couple of horses and getting there in a day without fatigue (because they only walked for six days and the horses only walked for one day) is vetoed by Elfstar. But she does agree to see if there are any horses for sale.

Getting Lost

It is difficult to get lost following a road or established trail, but when travelling through the wilderness away from such easy guides it is remarkably easy to get lost.

Each day that a party travels in wilderness without roads or trails, the party member who is leading the group (which may be an NPC guide of some kind) must make a Wisdom Check using their Navigating skill. The Game Master should give modifiers to the roll for things like prominent landmarks or the character living locally and having local knowledge of the area.

If the player makes the roll, they are confident of their location and the party goes in the direction that they intend to go.

If the player fails the roll, the Game Master should secretly roll 1d6.

If the party are in open terrain, then they will get lost on a roll of 1.

If the party are in swamp, desert or jungle, then they will get lost on a roll of 1-3.

If the party are in other terrain, then they will get lost on a roll of 1-2.

If the party becomes lost, the players should not be informed of this.

Instead, the Game Master should roll again to see which direction the party end up going in (it is better for the Game Master to always make this roll, even if it is not necessary—that way the players don’t know whether or not their characters are lost).

If the second roll is 1-3, the party accidentally travel 60° (one hex side if using a hex map) to the left of their intended direction. If the second roll is 46, the party accidentally travel 60° (one hex side if using a hex map) to the right of their intended direction.

The players should not be informed that their characters have become lost, and the Game Master should do their best to describe directions as if the characters were actually going the way they think they’re going.

Once lost, the leader of the group still makes a Navigating check each day. If they keep failing the checks, they will continue to travel the way they were travelling the previous day without realising their error (and the Game Master must roll again to see if they veer further off course).

Once the party leader succeeds in their daily Navigating check, they will realise that they are travelling in the wrong direction (and which direction they are actually travelling in) and—if they were intending to travel to a specific location rather than just exploring—which direction their destination now lies in.

Example: Aloysius is travelling through the desert by camel. He has a Wisdom of 9, and possesses no Navigating skill.

Unfortunately, his local guide has died; and he is trying to find his way back to the oasis by himself. He knows that it is south of his current location.

On the first day, Andy (Aloysius’s player) rolls a Navigating check and fails.

Aloysius is, unsurprisingly, not entirely sure that he is heading in the right direction.

The Game Master secretly rolls a d6 to see if he gets lost, and a second d6 to see the direction that he will get turned in if he does get lost.

The first d6 is a 1, which means that Aloysius will be lost, and the second d6 is a 4, which means that he will actually spend the day travelling south west, thinking he is travelling south.

After travelling what he thinks is south for the whole day, Aloysius camps for the night.

On the second day, he tries a Navigating check again, and fails again.

The Game Master rolls the two d6s again, and this time the first one comes up with a 5.

So Aloysius doesn’t get turned around and carries on travelling south west (although he— and Andy—still thinks he is travelling south).

After a second day of travelling south west, Aloysius makes another Navigating check on the third morning.

This time he succeeds, and realises that he is travelling south west instead of south.

Unfortunately he doesn’t know how long he has been going in the wrong direction for.

However, he does recognise some landmarks and realises that he needs to head east from his current location in order to reach the oasis.

Cursing his lack of direction sense, and hoping he doesn’t get lost again, he turns around and heads east.

Foraging

Although wise adventurers carry supplies with them, they sometimes prefer to—or need to—supplement their carried food with fresh food, whether hunted or foraged.

Characters who are travelling can gather food while on the move.

If the party move at only 2/3 of their normal per-day movement rate, they can gather (from hunting and foraging) half of their day’s food at the same time, meaning they only need to use half of a day’s carried food supply each day.

If the party chooses to remain stationary, they can gather (from hunting and foraging) a whole day’s food, and don’t need to use any of their carried supplies.

In either case, if the party member leading the foraging or hunting (which may be an NPC guide) succeeds in either a Tracking check or a Nature Lore check (they may choose which check to make, but cannot attempt both), twice as much food is gathered that day.

It is important to remember that if a party hunts while stationary in order to provide themselves with a food supply that they can carry with them for use while on the move, such unpreserved food supplies will only last a week before becoming inedible.

Parties who remain stationary cannot count a day spent gathering food as a day spent resting for the sake of avoiding or reducing fatigue.

At the Game Master’s discretion, some unusual locations might have an abundance or a dearth of food supplies, so foraging may be more or less effective in those locations.

Table 12-3: Waterborne Movement & Hull

Strength

Movement Rate*

Armour

Structure

Ship Type

Class

Points

Miles/Day

8-Mile Hexes/Day

Feet/Round River Barge

36 miles

4.5 hexes 60’

8

20-40 Barque

90 miles

11 hexes

150’

8

60-90 Canoe, River

18 miles

2 hexes

60’

9

5-10 Canoe, Sea

18 miles

2 hexes

60’

9

5-10 Galley

18/90 miles

2/11 hexes

90’/150’

8

80-100 Longship

18/90 miles

2/11 hexes

90’/150’

8

60-80 Quinquirime

12/72 miles

1.5/9 hexes

60’/120’

7

120-150 Raft, Professional

12 miles

1.5 hexes 30’

9

5-10 Raft, Scavenged

12 miles

1.5 hexes 30’

9

3-5 Rowing Boat

18 miles

2 hexes

30’

9

10-20 Skiff

72 miles

9 hexes

120’

8

20-40 Sloop

72 miles

9 hexes

120’

7

120-180 Trireme

18/72 miles

2/9 hexes

90’/120’

7

100-120 Troopship

54 miles

7 hexes

90’

7

160-220

Waterborne Movement

Taking to the seas can be an efficient way of travelling long distances.

However, it is not without risk.

Table 12-3 shows the movement rates of various types of ship. Some ships, such as galleys and longships, are given two movement rates because they can either sail or be rowed.

Rowing is much harder work than walking over long distances, so all row powered ships and boats have smaller per-day movement rates than their per- round movement rates would otherwise indicate. However, this reduced speed takes into account rower fatigue, so rowed ships and boats do not need to stop every six days for their crew to recover.

Wind & Storms

Sailing ships need wind to be able to travel, and are surprisingly adept at travelling even upwind by tacking.

For the purposes of Dark Dungeons, it is not necessary to track the exact wind direction and speed under normal circumstances. The sailing speeds of the various ships are averaged.

However, there are two wind conditions that can affect ships. They can become becalmed, or they can be lost in storms.

Each day that the party are out at sea (but not when they are sailing on inland lakes or rivers), the Game Master should roll 2d6.

If the Game Master rolls a 2, then there is no wind, and ships will become becalmed.

If the Game Master rolls a 12, there is a storm that day.

Any other result has no effect on sea travel.

Becalmed

When there is no wind, ships with sails cannot use them to move. Any such ship must either have the crew row, or must stay where it is for the day.

Ships with both sails and oars, such as galleys and longships, may still move by rowing while becalmed.

Storms

Storms are very dangerous to ships at sea. They can destroy even the largest ship unless the ship can “run before the storm”.

When the dice indicate that there is a storm, the first thing that the Game Master must do is to determine the wind direction randomly.

If the ship has working sails, the captain must decide whether to run before the storm or to try to weather it. The former is by far the safest option unless the wind is blowing the ship towards land.

If the ship runs before the storm, it moves at triple its normal daily movement rate in the direction of the wind.

If this does not bring it up against a coastline then the ship is safe.

However, if the ship is blown onto the coast when running before a storm then there is a 75% chance of it breaking up on rocks and sinking and a 25% chance of it being able to find a safe haven such as a port or a natural bay.

If the ship’s captain chooses to take down the sails and weather the storm, of if the ship does not have sails, then the ship will move half of its normal daily movement rate in the direction of the wind, and will have an 80% chance of breaking up in the storm and sinking.

If the ship does not break up, and this movement does not bring it up against a coastline, then the ship is safe.

However, if the ship is blown onto the coast when weathering a storm then there is a 75% chance of it breaking up on rocks and sinking and a 25% chance of it being able to find a safe haven such as a port or a natural bay.

Lost At Sea

When travelling across the sea, ships can get lost just as land travellers can get lost.

Any day that a ship starts out of sight of land (normally this will be any time it starts a day more than 8 miles, or 1 hex, from land) there is a chance for it to become lost.

The procedure is the same as for overland travel. The ship’s navigator (which may be a PC or an NPC) rolls a Navigating check, and if successful the ship is on course.

If the player fails the roll, the Game Master should secretly roll 1d6. The party will get lost on a roll of 1-2.

If the party becomes lost, the players should not be informed of this.

Instead, the Game Master should roll again to see which direction the party end up going in (it is better for the Game Master to always make this roll, even if it is not necessary—that way the players don’t know whether or not their characters are lost).

If the second roll is 1-3, the party accidentally travel 60° (one hex side if using a hex map) to the left of their intended direction. If the second roll is 46, the party accidentally travel 60° (one hex side if using a hex map) to the right of their intended direction.

The players should not be informed that their characters have become lost, and the Game Master should do their best to describe directions as if the characters were actually going the way they think they’re going.

Once lost, the leader of the group still makes a Navigating check each day. If they keep failing the checks, they will continue to travel the way they were travelling the previous day without realising their error (and the Game Master must roll again to see if they veer further off course).

Once the party leader succeeds in their daily Navigating check, they will realise that they are travelling in the wrong direction (and which direction they are actually travelling in), and—if they were intending to travel to a specific location rather than just exploring—which direction their destination now lies in.

Ship to Ship Combat

When the crew of two ships wish to fight, they can do so in three ways.

Firstly, if their ship is equipped with catapults or cannons, it can keep its distance from the enemy and try to sink it or drive it away.

Secondly, if the ship has ship’s rams attached, it can try to ram the enemy ship in order to sink it.

And finally, the ship can pull up alongside the enemy and grapple it, so that the crew can cross between the ships and fight hand to hand.

All of this combat is done using the normal combat rules found in Chapter

10: Combat. The captain of each ship declares what action the ship will perform, and the ships act in initiative order. Boarding Actions

If two ships pull alongside each other, (within 50’) either because one is in the process of ramming the other or because the captains wish to grapple and board, then either crew can attempt to grapple the other ship.

If both crews wish to grapple, then it is automatically successful. If only one crew wishes to grapple, then the other crew can roll 1d6; and on a 1-4, they manage to repel the grapple attempt by cutting and casting free the grappling hooks and lines.

If the grapple is successful, both ships are pulled tight together and crew can pass from one to the other in order to fight hand-to-hand.

Any character crossing between the two ships has difficulty manoeuvring due to having to climb over rails and ropes, and takes a +2 penalty to armour class and a –2 penalty to all attacks during the round in which they cross.

Damage to Ships

Ships that are damaged lose 10% of their speed for every 10% of their structure points that they have lost.

Rowed ships also lose 10% of their speed for every 10% of their rowers that are missing.

Once a ship has lost three quarters of its structure points, it is dead in the water and can no longer sail under its own power.

When a ship has lost all of its structure points, it sinks over the course of the next 1d10 rounds.

Repairing Ships

Makeshift repairs can repair up to half the damage that a ship has taken while at sea, providing there are at least five crew assigned to repair duty; with one structure point being repaired per ten minutes. Multiple five-person crews can repair a ship simultaneously.

These jury rigged repairs will only last for 6d6 days before coming irreparably apart.

To permanently and fully repair a ship it must either be docked or magic must be used.

Airborne Movement

There are a variety of ways that characters can travel by air. They may have mounts that can fly, such as pegasi, hippogriffs or even dragons. They may have magical flying devices such as Brooms of Flying or Flying Carpets. Or they may have a flying ship equipped with a Sail of Skysailing.

Mounts & Devices

Travelling by riding a flying mount or magical device uses the same movement rules as overland movement. The only difference being that all terrain is considered to be “road” for purposes of converting per-round movement speeds into daily movement speeds; with the exception of heavy rain and snow, which still reduce daily movement rates as normal.

When travelling on a flying mount or magical device, characters have no chance of getting lost. However, characters on flying mounts and devices are still subject to fatigue if they travel for more than six days without taking a rest day.

Character on flying mounts or devices cannot gather food while on the move.

Skysailing

Ships that are equipped with a Sail of Skysailing can fly at incredible speeds through the air. However, in order to do this they must be powered by a spell caster.

Effective spell caster level*

1 2 3 4

6 7 8 9

11 12 13 14

16 17 18 19

21 22 23 24

26 27 28 29

31 32 33 34

36

Manoeuvring

Speed

20’/round 20’/round 20’/round 20’/round 20’/round 40’/round 40’/round 40’/round 60’/round 60’/round 60’/round 60’/round 80’/round 80’/round 80’/round 80’/round 100’/round 100’/round 100’/round 120’/round 120’/round 120’/round 120’/round 140’/round 140’/round 140’/round 160’/round 160’/round 160’/round 160’/round 180’/round 180’/round 180’/round 180’/round 200’/round 200’/round

Table 12-4: Skysailing Speeds

Feet per round 400’/round 400’/round 400’/round 400’/round 400’/round 800’/round 800’/round 800’/round 1,200’/round 1,200’/round 1,200’/round 1,200’/round 1,600’/round 1,600’/round 1,600’/round 1,600’/round 2,000’/round 2,000’/round 2,000’/round 2,400’/round 2,400’/round 2,400’/round 2,400’/round 2,800’/round 2,800’/round 2,800’/round 3,200’/round 3,200’/round 3,200’/round 3,200’/round 3,600’/round 3,600’/round 3,600’/round 3,600’/round 4,000’/round 4,000’/round

Cruising Speed

Miles per day

400 miles 400 miles 400 miles 400 miles 400 miles 800 miles 800 miles 800 miles 1,200 miles 1,200 miles 1,200 miles 1,200 miles 1,600 miles 1,600 miles 1,600 miles 1,600 miles 2,000 miles 2,000 miles 2,000 miles 2,400 miles 2,400 miles 2,400 miles 2,400 miles 2,800 miles 2,800 miles 2,800 miles 3,200 miles 3,200 miles 3,200 miles 3,200 miles 3,600 miles 3,600 miles 3,600 miles 3,600 miles 4,000 miles 4,000 miles

spell caster level

8-mile Hexes per day

50 hexes 50 hexes 50 hexes 50 hexes 50 hexes 100 hexes 100 hexes 100 hexes 150 hexes 150 hexes 150 hexes 150 hexes 200 hexes 200 hexes 200 hexes 200 hexes 250 hexes 250 hexes 250 hexes 300 hexes 300 hexes 300 hexes 300 hexes 350 hexes 350 hexes 350 hexes 400 hexes 400 hexes 400 hexes 400 hexes 450 hexes 450 hexes 450 hexes 450 hexes 500 hexes 500 hexes

If a non-spell user takes the wheel of ship that has a Sail of Skysailing, it acts in all ways as a normal ship. However, if a spell user (i.e. a magic-user, elf, cleric, druid, shaman, or sorcerer) takes the wheel, they may concentrate for a round in order to activate the sails.

For the rest of the day, that spell user may while at the wheel -make the ship fly and control its course and speed.

Activating the sails drains the spell user of all spells they currently had prepared for the day, as if those spells had been cast.

The speed of the ship is determined by the effective level of the spell user who is controlling it. This effective level is based on the actual level of the spell caster, but reduced by three for each spell they have cast during the day prior to activating the sail, to a minimum of first level. See Table 12-4 to see the flying speed of the ship based on the spell user’s effective level.

The spell user must remain at the wheel of the ship for the duration of the flight. Leaving for more than 10 minutes stops the ship, and it starts sinking to the ground at a rate of 50’ per

round (5’ per second).

If this causes the ship to crash in water deep enough to hold it then it will be fine (assuming it is not damaged beyond seaworthiness, of course). If it lands on the ground it will take damage equal to 1d100% of its structure points.

Control of the ship may be regained by any spell user who spends a round reactivating the ship. Remember, however, that the original spell user will have used all their spells the first time they controlled it, so if they re- establish control they will be effectively first level.

A single spell user can fly a ship for 8 hours without a problem (and the daily movement rates in Table 12-4 are based on an 8-hour travelling day). The spell caster can pull a ‘double shift’ at the wheel, lasting for up to 16 hours, but for the second 8-hour shift they only have an effective level of one; and they will not regain spells the following morning, but must rest for a full day before they can regain spells or reactivate the sail.

Although the speed and heading of the ship are controlled by the spell user at the wheel, the ship still needs a full complement of crew to be controlled. Without a full complement of crew, the spell user at the wheel can make the ship rise and hover in place, but cannot make it fly in a straight line. Any attempt at horizontal movement will be at the mercy of the winds.

However, ships such as galleys that are normally supplemented by rowers do need them while flying. They do, however, need them if the land on water and wish to sail normally.

Take Off & Landing

The incredible flight speeds of ships equipped with a Sail of Skysailing can only be maintained in a roughly straight line, and are therefore only usually used at high altitude. When travelling at a low altitude, or taking off and landing, ships must drop to manoeuvring speed. This is much slower, but allows the ship to make significant heading changes and to do fine manoeuvres in order to land in a harbour or dry-dock.

A ship can be flown at cruising speed at low altitude, but doing so is often suicidally dangerous.

Switching from manoeuvring speed to cruising speed (or vice versa) takes 1d8 rounds of concentration.

A ship equipped with a Sail of Skysailing can land and take off normally on water, or from a specially constructed frame resembling a dry-dock where ships are built. Taking off in either situation requires 1d8 rounds of concentration in order to start the ship moving.

If a ship is forced to land in a controlled manner on normal ground, it will not be damaged, but it will roll onto its side. It will not be able to take off again unless it is righted and held upright for the duration of the take

off.

Leaving the Planet

Ships equipped with Sails of Skysailing have no upper altitude limit. Providing they have an adequate air supply, they may leave the planet completely and fly through space at speeds dwarfing even the fastest air speed to get to other planets and moons—or even leave the Celestial Sphere completely and fly through the Luminiferous Aether to other spheres.

See Chapter 15: Out of This World for detailed rules about flying outside the atmosphere.

Skysailing Combat

Because of the speed of Skysailing, combats and encounters are rare when a ship is flying at cruising speed.

Most natural creatures can’t keep up with one, and the speeds mean that two ships won’t even be in missile range of each other for a whole round before zooming off in different directions.

However, a ship that is travelling at manoeuvring speed is much more vulnerable to—and capable of—attack.

Flying ships in combat are treated just like normal ships in combat, and can grapple, board and ram each other.

Like normal ships they lose 10% of their speed for each 10% of their structure points that are missing, and when they have lost 75% of their structure points they are reduced to manoeuvring speed.

When a ship has lost 100% of its structure points, it can no longer fly and will fall to the ground.

Wilderness Encounters

Unlike dungeon situations, where there tend to be fixed structures with fixed creatures living in them, adventuring in the wilderness is a lot more random.

Table 12-5: Wilderness Encounter Chances

Chance of Encounter

Terrain (1d12) Day Night Barren Lands 1-4 1-2 City 1-4 1-2 Clear 1-2 1 Desert 1-4 1-2 Flying (any terrain) 1-4 1-2 Forest 1-4 1-2 Grasslands 1-2 1 Hills 1-4 1-2 Jungle 1-6 1-3 Mountains 1-6 1-3 Ocean 1-4 1-2 River 1-4 1-2 Settled 1-2 1 Swamp 1-6 1-3

Table 12-6: Wilderness Encounters 1d8 Roll Barren Mountains Hills City Clear Grassland Desert Jungle 1 Animal Human Animal Animal Animal 2 Dragon Human Animal Animal Animal 3 Dragon Human Dragon Dragon Dragon 4 Flyer Human Flyer Flyer Flyer 5 Human Human Human Human Human 6 Humanoid Human Humanoid Human

Humanoid 7 Humanoid Humanoid Insect Humanoid

Insect 8 Unusual Undead Unusual Undead Insect 1d8 Roll Ocean River Settled Swamp

Woods

While there may be particular fixed locations that the Game Master has marked on their map as being the lairs of monsters or the territories of particular races; most of the time it is not feasible to work this out in advance for every square mile of the country or even planet that the players might want to explore. In the same way that characters may encounter wandering monsters in dungeons (see Chapter 9: Dungeon Delving for details), they may also encounter wandering monsters. The Game Master should check twice per 24-hour period; once during the day and once during the night. The chance of an encounter occurring is based on the type of terrain that the party is travelling through, and can be found on Table 12-5. If the party is travelling through terrain that fits more than one category (e.g. wooded hills), or is travelling through more than one type of terrain during the day, then the Game Master should pick whichever type is most suitable.

1 Dragon 2 Flyer 3 Human 4 Swimmer 5 Swimmer 6 Swimmer 7 Swimmer 8 Swimmer

Once the type of encounter has been determined, the exact encounter can either be determined by the Game Master’s wishes or rolled randomly using 1d12 on the relevant table. The number of creatures encountered is not given on the encounter tables. Instead it is found in the monster descriptions in Chapter 10: Monsters. In the monster descriptions in that chapter, two numbers are given for each monster— a lair group and a wandering group. The Game Master is free to select whether the party have come across a wandering group of the monsters or whether they have come across the monsters’ lair. When selecting this, the Game Master should take into account both the party’s current activity (exploring, travelling along a well

worn road, or stationary) and what type of lair the monsters are likely to have. Animal Animal Dragon Animal Flyer Castle* Human Dragon Humanoid Flyer Insect Human Swimmer Human Swimmer Humanoid

encounters

If the Game Master wishes, they can replace these tables with tables specific to the areas of their own worlds—for example a particular mountain range might not contain kobolds, but might be known to contain lots of orcs. A replacement table could be made for that mountain range with the “kobold” entries swapped for additional “orc” entries.

Castles

The “Settled” column of Table 12-6 has an entry labelled “Castle”. Unlike the other entries on that table, this entry does not link to another table. If the Game Master already has a detailed map of the area, and there is no such castle, then this entry should be re-rolled. Otherwise, it means that the party has arrived at a castle or other stronghold.

Dragon Animal Flyer Animal Human Dragon Humanoid Flyer Insect Human Swimmer Humanoid Undead Insect Undead Unusual

Table 12-7: Animals 1d12 Roll Barren Clear Desert Grassland

Hills 1 Animal (Herd) Animal (Herd) Animal

(Herd) Animal (Herd) Animal (Herd) 2 Ape (Cave) Ape (Rock Baboon) Animal

(Herd) Ape (Rock Baboon) Ape (Cave) 3 Ape (Rock Baboon) Boar Camel Boar Ape

(Rock Baboon) 4 Ape (Snow) Cat (Lion) Camel Cat

(Lion) Ape (Snow) 5 Bear (Cave) Donkey Cat (Lion) Donkey

Bear (Cave) 6 Bear (Grizzly) Elephant Cat (Lion)

Elephant Bear (Grizzly) 7 Cat (Mountain Lion) Ferret (Giant)

Lizard (Giant Gecko) Ferret (Giant) Cat

(Mountain Lion) 8 Mule Ferret (Giant) Lizard (Giant

Tuatara) Ferret (Giant) Mule 9 Snake (Pit Viper) Horse (Riding)

Snake (Pit Viper) Horse (Riding) Snake

(Pit Viper) 10 Snake (Rattler) Lizard (Giant Draco)

Snake (Rattler) Lizard (Giant Draco)

Snake (Rattler) 11 Wolf (Dire) Snake (Pit Viper) Spider

(Black Widow) Snake (Pit Viper) Wolf

(Dire) 12 Wolf (Normal) Snake (Rattler) Spider

(Tarantella) Snake (Rattler) Wolf

(Normal) 1d12 Roll Jungle Mountains River

Settled Woods 1 Animal (Herd) Animal (Herd) Animal

(Herd) Animal (Herd) Animal (Herd) 2 Boar Ape (Cave) Boar Animal (Herd)

Boar 3 Cat (Panther) Ape (Rock Baboon) Cat

(Panther) Boar Cat (Panther) 4 Lizard (Giant Draco) Ape (Snow) Cat

(Tiger) Cat (Tiger) Cat (Tiger) 5 Lizard (Giant Gecko) Bear (Cave) Crab

(Giant) Ferret (Giant) Lizard (Giant

Gecko) 6 Lizard (Giant Horned) Bear (Grizzly)

Crocodile Horse (Riding) Lizard (Giant

Draco) 7 Rat (Giant) Cat (Mountain Lion)

Crocodile (Large) Rat (Giant) Lizard

(Giant Tuatara) 8 Shrew (Giant) Mule Fish (Giant

Rockfish) Shrew (Giant) Snake (Pit

Viper) 9 Snake (Pit Viper) Snake (Pit Viper)

Leech (Giant) Snake (Racer) Spider

(Crab Spider) 10 Snake (Rock Python) Snake (Rattler)

Rat (Giant) Snake (Pit Viper) Unicorn 11 Snake (Spitting Cobra) Wolf (Dire)

Shrew (Giant) Spider (Tarantella) Wolf To generate a random castle, first roll 1d20 to see who the owner of the castle 12 Spider (Crab Spider) The Game Master should also roll 1d6, to determine what allegiance the cas- Wolf (Normal) Toad (Giant) Encounter Balance Wolf Wolf (Dire) is: 1-3 = Cleric 4 = Dwarf 5 = Elf 6-14 = Fighter 15 = Halfling 16-18 = Magic-User 19-20 = Thief tle’s owner has to the rulers of the country: Obviously, this allegiance will not

usually be openly displayed to a passing adventuring party. 1-2 = Fanatically loyal 3-5 = Reasonably loyal 6 = Disloyal

The encounters listed on the following pages vary tremendously in strength, ranging from simple kobolds to mighty dragon queens.

Some encounters may be very easy for the party to overcome, and others may well be nigh impossible to overcome in any way other than the party simply hiding or fleeing from the creature(s) that they have encountered. This owner will be a level 1d20+8 character of that class.

Table 12-8: Humans

1d12 Roll

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112

1d12 Roll

1 Adventurer Adventurer Acolyte

Adventurer Adventurer 2 Buccaneer Bandit Adventurer

Adventurer Bandit 3 Buccaneer Buccaneer Bandit Bandit

Bandit 4 Merchant Buccaneer Bandit Bandit

Berserker 5 Merchant Buccaneer Cleric Berserker

Brigand 6 Merchant Cleric Fighter Brigand

Brigand 7 Merchant Cleric Magic-User Cleric

Cleric 8 Merchant Fighter Merchant Fighter

Druid 9 Pirate Magic-User Noble Magic-User

Druid 10 Pirate Merchant NPC Party Merchant

Fighter 11 Pirate Merchant Trader NPC Party

Magic-User 12 Pirate NPC Party Veteran Trader

Merchant

Clear

Adventurer Bandit Bandit Berserker Brigand Cleric Fighter Magic-User Merchant Merchant Noble Nomad

Ocean

Desert

Adventurer Cleric Dervish Dervish Fighter Magic-User Merchant Noble Nomad Nomad Nomad Nomad

River

Grassland

Adventurer Bandit Bandit Berserker Brigand Cleric Fighter Magic-User Merchant Merchant Noble Nomad

Settled

Hill

Adventurer Bandit Berserker Berserker Brigand Cleric Fighter Magic-User Merchant Neanderthal Neanderthal Neanderthal

Swamp

Jungle

Adventurer Adventurer Bandit Berserker Brigand Brigand Brigand Cleric Fighter Magic-User Merchant Neanderthal

Woods

Table 12-9: Humanoids 1d12 Roll Barren Clear City Settled Desert Grassland 1 Dwarf Bugbear Dwarf Giant (Fire)

Bugbear 2 Giant (Frost) Elf Elf Goblin Elf 3 Giant (Hill) Giant (Hill) Giant

(Hill) Goblin Giant (Hill) 4 Giant (Stone) Gnoll Gnome Hobgoblin

Gnoll 5 Giant (Storm) Gnoll Gnoll Hobgoblin

Gnoll 6 Gnome Goblin Goblin Ogre Goblin 7 Goblin Halfling Halfling Ogre

Halfling 8 Kobold Hobgoblin Hobgoblin Ogre

Hobgoblin 9 Kobold Ogre Ogre Orc Ogre 10 Orc Orc Orc Orc Orc 11 Troglodyte Pixie Pixie Pixie Pixie 12 Troll Troll Sprite Sprite Troll 1d12 Roll Hill Mountain Jungle River Swamp Woods

This variation is an essential part of the game—it is dangerous out in the wilderness and low level parties venture away from settled areas at their own risk—and therefore the Game Master shouldn’t feel that they have to re- roll encounters that are unsuitable for the party’s level. The players should not get the feeling that the world is “levelling up” as they do, and that the Game Master is simply selecting monsters of an appropriate difficulty.

1 Dwarf 2 Giant (Frost) 3 Giant (Hill) 4 Giant (Stone) 5 Giant (Storm) 6 Gnome 7 Goblin 8 Kobold 9 Kobold 10 Orc 11 Troglodyte 12 Troll

On the other hand, it is important for the Game Master to be fair to the players. There’s no fun in a low level party leaving town and getting eaten by a dragon on the first night. The Game Master should therefore ensure that overwhelming fights can be avoided, whether that is through the party spotting the encounter before it spots them and hiding or avoiding it, or whether it is through the encounter not necessarily being hostile.

Bugbear Bugbear Cyclops Elf Elf Gnoll Giant (Fire) Hobgoblin Giant (Hill) Lizard Man Gnoll Lizard Man Goblin Nixie Lizard Man Ogre Ogre Orc Orc Orc Troglodyte Sprite Troll Troll

Obviously, if the party act in a belligerent or hostile manner to creatures that are far more powerful than they are, then they may well be killed. But it is unfair (and not fun for the players) to put them straight into a combat situation that they can’t win just because the dice rolled a particularly hard encounter, without giving them any chance to avoid a fight by fleeing, parleying or hiding.

Gnoll Bugbear Goblin Cyclops Hobgoblin Dryad Lizard Man Elf Lizard Man Elf Lizard Man Giant (Hill) Nixie Gnoll Ogre Goblin Orc Hobgoblin Troglodyte Ogre Troll Orc Troll Troll

Table 12-10: Other Wilderness

Encounters Table 12-10: Other

Wilderness Encounters 1d12 Roll

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1d12 Roll

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Dragons Flyers (Mountain) Flyers

(Desert) Flyers (Other) Insects Chimera Bee (Giant) Gargoyle Bee

(Giant) Ant (Giant) Dragon (Black) Gargoyle Gargoyle

Cockatrice Bee (Giant) Dragon (Blue) Griffon Griffon Gargoyle

Beetle (Giant Bombard) Dragon (Gold) Harpy Harpy Griffon

Beetle (Giant Fire) Dragon (Green) Hippogriff Insect Swarm

Hippogriff Beetle (Giant Tiger) Dragon (Red) Insect Swarm Lizard (Giant

Draco) Lizard (Giant Draco) Insect

Swarm Dragon (White) Manticore Manticore

Pegasus Rhagodessa (Giant) Dragon Queen (Any) Pegasus Manticore

Pixie Robber Fly (Giant) Hydra Robber Fly (Giant) Manticore

Robber Fly (Giant) Scorpion (Giant) Hydra Roc (Small) Roc (Small) Roc

(Small) Spider (Black Widow) Wyvern Roc (Large) Roc (Large) Sprite

Spider (Crab Spider) Wyvern Roc (Giant) Roc (Giant) Stirge

Spider (Tarantella)

Swimmers (River/Lake)

Crab (Giant) Crocodile Crocodile (Large) Fish (Giant Bass) Fish (Giant Sturgeon) Leech (Giant) Leech (Giant) Lizard Man Lizard Man Merman Nixie Termite (Giant Water)

Swimmers (Ocean)

Giant (Storm) Hydra (Sea) Hydra (Sea) Hydra (Sea) Merman Snake (Sea) Snake (Sea) Snake (Sea) Snake (Sea) Termite (Giant Water) Termite (Giant Water) Termite (Giant Water)

Swimmers (Swamp)

Crab (Giant) Crocodile Crocodile Crocodile (Large) Crocodile (Large) Leech (Giant) Leech (Giant) Leech (Giant) Lizard Man Lizard Man Termite (Giant Water) Termite (Giant Water)

Undead

Ghoul Ghoul Ghast Mummy Skeleton Skeleton Spectre Wight Wraith Vampire Zombie Zombie

Unusual

Basilisk Blink Dog Centaur Gorgon Medusa Mournwolf Treant Werebear Wereboar Wererat Weretiger Werewolf